Revenge on Frozen Gnome with the Solo IAT 50k

The Frozen Gnome 50k DNF and the Solo 50k on the Ice Age Trail Revenge

January 11, 2020 – Crystal Lake, Illinois

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You wouldn’t think Illinois was hilly, but somehow, someway, they found some in a seemingly small park or two with many trails and loops. That’s part of the magic with Ornery Mule Racing events. Every trail gem will be found and showcased. The caveat of this race was that it takes place in the middle of January in the upper Midwest winter. There is a 10k and 50k option on a 10k looped course with one main aid stations at the start of each loop…and boy was it an aid station. The course cut off was 8.5 hours on a very hilly course for the 50k.

I ended up signing up for it as a training race and a way to better force myself to figure out winter running especially with my cold urticaria (allergy to the cold). Everything regarding this has been so complicated. But it seemed race day temps weren’t going to be too bad. 32 degree start, with winds almost matching the temps.

The biggest unknown with the forecast was if it was going to rain. Rain around freezing temps is more complicated than snow, as rain will soak through as it takes a long while before snow will do the same. Luckily it held off, but it did pour on course beforehand so the trails would be muddy for sure. Rich and I stayed the night with a friend only a few miles from the event. Got up, headed out, and got a nice parking space, which there seemed to be plenty of. I hung out with friendo Megan who was out for the 10k, as were most of my friends at the race, and we had donuts. I spent time in the car getting all my gear on, which included my baselayer, a sweatshirt, and my light waterproof Altra Wasatch jacket. I borrow a pair of baselayer leggings from Megan, and topped them off with another wind layer tight and wool skirt. I was all jacked up in layers. Oh did I mention the buff for my neck too and winter beanie? I was a hot mess of random collected stuff, and nothing matched. Very unlike me, but I wasn’t about to DNF due to clothing choices just because I wanted to be cute.

Race started shortly after dawn (after 7am). I met a few trail sisters and friends near the start, making it really feel like a reunion. Though I was not as prepared to run 31 miles that day, I toed the starting line…training run, right. I had a plan based on effort, and stuck with it. The first loop, I stayed with Megan for a while, but her 10k effort was faster than where I needed to be to sustain for 5 loops.

The course started in a park, and quickly swung out into the trails of the park, passing by a lake/pond thing and we hit some icy bridges. I had enough footing to trot across, but without spikes, it was slower going. The course rose up some stairs and continued on some open prairie trails. I was still in more a conga line, and mostly behind a lot of slower people until the end of loop 1. After the prairie, we entered the woods and the trail rolled along…something I need to work at being better at physically. There was some mud along this path, got worse after each pass. Very slick footing that people lost the battle with on the downhills.

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About half way through the loop, I came upon this really muddy section that was very akin to what I had to go through at Rocky Raccoon several times for several several miles.

I knew tip toeing around it would do no good, and time would be lost by doing so, like I was seeing everyone doing. It’s best to not make trails wider than they are anyway by “going around”. So with power and speed, I pressed straight through. Good tip, the faster you go, the less time it takes for the mud water to enter your shoes and the less that gets in them overall. There were 5 loops, so this would happen again regardless.

The course rose more up for a smaller loop around some neat trees and a bit more mud. The course was tacky but with the falling snow (now), the ground was beginning to freeze…but not enough to make a difference. Having the ground freeze would have been more useful in my honest opinion.

The last parts of the course had some really steep inclines, and I got to power hike them with my skill, which was nice to have that speed there on others. Coming down was easy, but I came to one spot that was pretty icy.

82386835_2598617710192308_4369358324295008256_o I did not take note at that time where it was. There were spots between the tree to see how far up you were though. Butt Slide Hill, one usual feature of this winter race, was something to look forward to. I was indeed curious as to how slidey this hill was for me. There was the rope there, but no snow to slide on. In fact, the mud wasn’t even an issue there either! I ran straight down and it was a wheeeeee moment.

The rest of the course wound through the woods up and down and around. Some neat tree fungi clung to their bark. I fought the urge to take pictures. Coming into the finish area, it was nasty. Puddles abound, and the finish line was deep with water. The cold seeped in and I stepped to the side and to the aid station to refill. I was only carrying 1L of water, and I went through it all. Topped it off and had a bunch of soda and took off again. The second loop started out much better being able to pace myself without the crowds from the first time around.

82054260_2598622106858535_7542456557439549440_oI scooted around. Snow was lightly covering the trails so you could see the most recent footsteps. Things were going swimmingly and paces were great overall for my time goals. I was staying warm, although had some mental complaints about the head my head was giving off, and opted to fully unzip my jacket. Around mile 10.6, I saw a volunteer taping off part of the trail I guess maybe people had gotten lost on or wasn’t marked well enough. Not watching my footing taking a sharp left turn on the trail, my left foot slipped on the icy mud forward and my right leg went backwards causing me to split and since it was downhill, I sat on that backwards leg. OUCH.

The volunteer came over to me to help me get up but I literally had to sit there for a bit and really rearrange myself; take my leg out from under me, as my groin and hip really pulled the tendons and muscles to my right knee which hurt the worse immediately. Left leg seemed unaffected other than the achy knee pain I’d been suffering since Freight Train in mid-December (I had to remind myself it had not even been a month since finishing that). With great amounts of help from said volunteer, it took 3 minutes to get on my feet (my garmin had stopped from the fall, hands took some damaged but it was superficial). I hurt, and it wasn’t good. I was not even sure I could make it back to the finish…about a 2 mile journey. I still wanted to try and walk it off, so I meandered down the hill, limping pretty badly. In the back of my head I knew it was over. This race wasn’t worth further damage.

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I eventually made it back to the start, and sent Rich off for my trekking poles (I had brought in case the mud was really bad). I decided on one more loop, that maybe somehow I could still finish this, maybe the pain would just dissipate enough that I could pull it off. My 11-12 min/mi became 17-20 min/mi. I couldn’t even power hike. I forced my weight onto my right pole for support. The whole loop, I said goodbye to all the features I had gotten to know along the way, and took pictures on this loop. I knew that fall had been a nail in the coffin for my 2nd ever DNF. Even if I had forced my body to continue another 2 loops after I hit the finish line again, I would not make the cut off. There was no longer any point to be on course. The ground was getting better with every passing mile though, and wish I could have stayed longer. I made it 3 loops total of the 5, making it 18.6 miles, 8 miles on the busted side, which happened to really be an upset hip. It’s hard to tell when you are on course if the injury you got will get worse progressively or if you can push through it. I felt the entire time I had really overstretched or overextended the muscles there. I might have pulled something, I have no idea. But I have goals this year in 2020 and this wasn’t worth sacrificing those goals, not now.

At the end, I wanted to cry, I knew it was over long before I crossed that line for the final time. A volunteer greeted me with a medal from a previous years’ 10k. I refused it the best I could. I did not do what I had come to do and did not deserve anything. He still gave it to me, and a promptly took it off and gave it to Rich. This is when I truly grasped how amazing the aid station and start/finish line really was.

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There was a heated tent on the side, had hot coco and other drinks, many benches to sit on and heated fans blowing hot air around. It was purely amazing. I saw everything at the aid station. They had all the basis covered for food and drink there. Nothing less from Ornery Mule. I shouldn’t have sat for so long, it was a long few miles to drive back and getting to the car even after I was done for the day. I was freezing soon after.

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I decided to take a designated break from every physical activity after that for at least 3 days. Knee pain almost disappeared entirely, and now seems like a thing of the weird past. I got up some nice snow miles in the fresh snow, but then Wisconsin decided to stop snowing yet stay near freezing temps. I spent two weeks planning out how I was going to make up this 50k. I decided on a route based on the Ice Age Trail so I would have less chance of getting lost, and made it one-way to motivate me and to see more of the trail in one go.

I decided on starting this winter ultra trip half way through the Whitewater Lake Segment, heading north through the Blackhawk Segment, then crossing into the Blue Spring Lake Segment, to the Stony Ridge Segment, to the Eagle Segment, and on to the Scuppernong Segment for a final hurrah. It sounds very simple, follow the yellow blazes. But I’ve never been there on those trails before. I have no idea what the trails looked like, winterized or not. I had a high chance of getting lost or something going wrong. Megan wanted to help out, so we devised a plan where she would car hop to specific meeting locations along the trail where it would cross a road. She sometimes would get out and head backwards towards me on the trail to meet me, and we’d both run back to the van, then she would go to the next meeting location and so on.

Planning on a Friday two weeks out from Gnome, things collapsed before they started. Andrea was going to let me stay the night at her place and we would take my car to the finish to drop it off, and then her take me down to the start, but she had to get in a 20 miler, and I didn’t want to interfere with that plan. Megan had curling, and I didn’t want her to be pressed for time either. So I delayed it for a week. The snow that fell that week stayed put through the whole next week, as we went through minor melting and re-freezing day/night cycles, temperatures on fluctuating between 25 and 34, with very overcast skies for days on end. I was kind of worried about the unknown trail conditions, and how traveled on or not they were since the snows.

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So January 30th, I headed out to Delafield where I would shop for 1.5 hours to cure off some of my “race” anxiety. What fun it was. Then out to Andrea’s. I had a rough nights sleep there, remembering not sleeping and looking at the clock thinking it was 11pm and it was 1am. That’s about how my nights go when I’m anxious. I naturally woke again and again, and finally woke “woke” up around 5:30am, we were to leave the house at 6am to make it to the start at 7am and start. I rose to my phone not being completely charged (yup, that’s what I forgot this time, a phone charger), and a notification from my weather app saying there was freezing fog and slick spots. I didn’t really pay mind to it until I was following Andrea to Scupp in my car and saw her run a stop sign for no reason until I tried to stop and I also ran said stop sign. Speed was quickly adjusted for.

We both made it, parked my car after filling out a state annual park pass (oops), and headed for the start on Esterly Road on the Whitewater segment. Megan messaged me telling me about the ice. Yeah, we knew. We all arrived safe at the meeting lot, snow covered and icy. We were late due to the extra caution, but what’s 15 minutes?

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It was about 28 degrees and overcast, just like it had been for over a week already. Nothing changed. No real wind to worry about. We took some pictures, and I pushed off into the woods.

Andrea yells at me from behind “follow the yellow!”

I was alone. The trail was pretty nice! As soon as my friends were out of sight and I took a left onto the Ice Age Trail (IAT), the trail became not nice hahaha. It was immediately a narrow, one foot in front of the other path, covered in ice from where they path had been beaten down. Some sections would crop up that were less icy, and had some more snow cover, but for the most part, it was hard to get traction or footing to push off. So I shuffled along quickly realizing within minutes that my legs were pretty swollen from sitting all day the previous day (should have had the shake out bike or something low key). Once the swelling feeling subsided, I was bombarded with the “let’s fall asleep” foot, except this time it happened to be BOTH feet taking turns! I stopped periodically when I started to get the pins and needles feeling to remove my foot slightly from the shoe and take whatever pressure from it off. This cycle continued for 2.5 miles.

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Megan had run her van ahead and met me coming back about 1.75 miles from her parking spot on the trail. She told me about the hills and such, but the main thing on my mind was the trail conditions. I hardly had time to think of the gain or hills or whatever. My sole focus was being upright the whole time and not taking any risks that would put me in danger. My shuffling had put me at a 16 min/mi almost right off the bat. This depressed me, and I didn’t know it was going to get worse.

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The very narrow path.

We got back to the van, and dropped my jacket off and headed back out quickly. The next section was much of the same narrow icy trail, and I started thinking to myself:

Well I didn’t shave my legs for this, so that’s good.

This is really the Ice trail, not the Ice Age Trail.

My ankles will be made of steel for the rest of the year!

How did Annie NOT get lost?!

I wonder if I’ll PR all these Kettle sections on Strava?

What are all these black dots? Soot, I’m sure. (They were actually bugs.)

Overall the blackhawk segment was pretty well traveled. And I had no right to complain about the ice. I would have borrowed spikes, but there just weren’t long enough sections in my mind to justify using something new to me so early on. Looking back, they would have increased my pace by a fair bit. Because it was well traveled, I did not have to worry about breaking trail. Although it was difficult footing, I could manage without falling. The snow sections were more difficult since the divots in the snow were deep and partially frozen over from the constant melting/refreezing cycle.

I would spend my time guessing if the foot size was male or female, or what shoes they wore. At some point I swear I ran into cowboy boot, or pointy high heel, shoes prints.

Pretty soon I made it to Young road (or thereabouts), I met up with Megan and grabbed an oatmeal cream pie, consuming Sprite every chance we met (including the first time which was all I took in). I had plenty of what Megan calls “onboard” nutrition in the form of liquid gels (great for winter!).

Speaking of packs, I decided to weigh my pack. It was just under 8lbs without the nutrition, so I’m sure it ended up being around 8lbs for the run. I did this on purpose because I knew I would have to carry more for the Georgia Death Race in March, including the 1.5lb railroad spike. But I had nutrition, extra water, a mylar blanket for safety, my phone, ipod, and spike in my pack. I admit, it’s heavy.

I headed out and up from there. I believe the next stop would be horse camp. I went through a forest of pines, a LOT of the same age pines. Some had red paint slash marks on them. I was confused about why they had them on them. 83823431_2639825506071528_6043692401984274432_oThe terrain got worse, as everything in the forested pine section had melted slight and frozen completely over creating mini foot hills that you couldn’t get a good hold on and my feet were sliding out from me every which way. Though no snow, so no depth to the course, it was hard to run on. I found a broken pine branch and put it in my hair (about the half marathon mark now), I remarked how slow I was). I ended up carrying it along for a lot more miles. Some of the end of the trail was snowshoed. Although this didn’t make it easier by much, the trail was a bit wider in places, but inconsistently so.

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Coming out at horse camp, I knew I needed something more on my back where my pack was. I asked Megan to Vaseline my back up. She was on it. I had some hot coco here she had brought and more Sprite. Most sections between where I would meet Megan would now be less than 4 miles.

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Not so runnable, but fluffier snow. I’ll take it.

I was pretty stoked about this. The next section was snowier, and was a little more manageable, but some deeper snow had my ankles getting really unhappy, and my wet feet were taking a beating with the shifting snow underfoot. I had to slow down if I was going to keep going for twice the number of miles I was at. I reluctantly took it slower and power hiked a bit more to save my feet and ankles, following frozen footsteps that had long come before me in the snow. I tell you, following other people’s gait and stride length is not something I recommend ever.

 

 

 

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Cool fungus tree.

Megan ran back to meet me again (trying to get her monthly mileage goal on the last day of the month!), and we took a quick detour to her car at Emma Carlin. It was right around here somewhere I got to one confusing intersection. I opened up my phone and looked to see which direction to continue on. I was about to choose wrong. Straight or right? Both were well traveled (as the previous segment had not been as well traveled). Right was the correct choice.

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Continuing on, the trail dumped out into my first real long prairie section. The footing was especially hard and deep here, that my running dropped to a fast shuffle, picking my potholes to try and dig into, when all of a sudden the trail opened up! For whatever reason, the trail became completely runnable along with some shallow bulldozer tracks. The wind also picked up in this section. But I was running! This was the first time I could actually sustain a pace and only turn my ankles every so often instead of every other step. I had two good miles when my watch beeped….what?!

 

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Last picture before my phone died.

I saw it display a facebook notification. I most certainly did not turn bluetooth on, because that would drain my batteries, both phone and watch. My screen would not display, turn on, or do anything. I also noticed my flashlight on! What in the world? I tried every button. I eventually managed (in like 3 minutes) to hard reset the phone on my way up some random hill after this nice runnable prairie. 5% battery?! I couldn’t do anything. My battery went from 40-some % to 5% in seconds. I guessed it was the cold and the wind took whatever heat I was giving it away. I hurried towards whatever road Megan was going to be waiting at. I knew people would freak out if my strava beacon stopped tracking. After some GREAT running miles around mile 17-20 (great as in compared to anything else on trail that day), I reached Megan and gave her the scoop. She would try to charge my phone and get word out to people I did not die.

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The snowmen on the trails kept me company.

I at some point had taken my first gel, being able to fill up on tons of soda and hot coco for a while and often enough. This gel was SIS lemon-lime, I did not prefer the flavor, but the texture was amazing for the temperatures, and still liquid. Will have to remember this if it gets cold. I kept an extra cream pie in my pocket to get mushy and warm, this also worked well. Though I knew I was irritated with the course conditions when the crinkling of the simple plastic bag it came it got on my last nerve.

Mile 19 was my fastest, sub 13 minute mile!! I know that sounds very slow, but given course conditions I’m going to praise it. Mile 20 was over 13 minutes but I also had stopped to get aid, so that’s a huge win. The Stony Ridge Segment was FABULOUS, great running, a few hills that kept you moving, but the trail was plowed? Sledded on? I wasn’t sure but there was more the two feet width to the trail and it was fairly level even with the previous foot steps in it. I was very thankful. The next stop would be Wilton Road. I felt bad leaving my phone with Megan, but it was a useless paper weight unless it could communicate with the outside world. She would try and charge it while I ran the next short segment.

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Charles the Possom.

The trail got a bit tougher the closer I got to Wilton Road, the aid station I ran in a local North Face Race in September (it was so warm then!). I reached the famed spot and Megan informed me that she couldn’t charge it with her cables, and needed to run to my car (now were we closing in on where it was parked) to get my cable. I told her that was fine. I was doing mostly ok with less aid that I planned up to that point, so what was 3 more miles?

I headed out into the prairie north of Wilton Road. It didn’t look like anyone had really been there since the snow. I realized maybe ONE person had been out this way since the snow 1-1.5 weeks ago. Being exposed to the sky, it was really hard packed on top, the kind of snow you step on and are on top of for a split second before sinking deep in the snow below the surface. The person who had been there had clearly been hiking or walking because the steps were not very far apart, too far for MY walking/hiking, and too short for running. This was really awkward, so I started breaking trail instead, but the thickness of the ice layer on top of the snow was making moving VERY difficult, and I slowed tremendously. The snow here was calf deep, as most of the other places where I had to be in snow was only ankle deep or a little more or less. Each step was extremely draining, having to pull my leg forcibly upward, and while I tried to step where they had been a person sometimes, the edges of the hole would catch the wrong way and I would stumble. Keeping upright was being made difficult with every step. This section was so soul sucking, I wanted to cry. There was no way out, and with the snow melting in my shoes and refreshing the skin of my feet with freezing water (melted snow) every step of the way, I was losing body heat fast.

It didn’t take 10 minutes for me to super chill. I went from good to bad that fast, and I was not moving very fast (though as fast as I personally could have). I tried to start running a bit to get my blood flowing faster and get feeling back to my feet, but the snow dragged me backwards and pulled at my knees and hips. If this had been fresh snow, it would have been much easier to deal with and faster to run in. When you have fresh snow, or snow that isn’t as melty/frozen, you can pull your legs through the snow with little/less resistance. Frozen snow, you have to pick up your feet all the way up and out, you can’t shuffle or drag your way through it. I wasted a ton of energy. It was a great and fun challenge up to here, mile 22. But if I did not keep moving, I would not make it. This stretch lasted almost 3 miles until I made it near highway 67, a large parking lot.

A little before making it to the parking lot, all of a sudden, the well trodden trails returned instantly, like there was a designated “thou shall not pass” sign that was invisible to me that I crossed paths with. The running was not ideal, but it was a blessing to not be stuck in iced snow fields exposed to the wind. I was back in the forest too, a place I had run before! I had run this section with Andrea two years prior for a 15 mile run. I was close. My spirits lifted as I met the only human I encountered thus far. He was a nice hiker, I stopped for quick conversation and asked how he was doing. He was telling me about how he cleared this nearby tree from blocking the path completely “just the other day!” Always be kind, and it lifts you up. I told him I came from Whitewater, he said “I know where that is!” I did it today I proclaimed on my way up the hill. “Oh really? That’s pretty far, I hope you have a good rest of your day.” He was so nice! I milled uphill away from him and saw more snow bugs. I had entered known territory.

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Upon reaching the parking lot to meet Megan, she gave me a 60% charged phone as I started strava again. I took in a can of goodies and hot coco this time. I had filled up water at Wilton, and decided no more water (it was really heavy and I was done feeling extra heavy). I kept worrying about Megan getting in and out of these icy parking lots, but she kept magically doing it like clockwork. I headed out towards the Scuppernong trails.

It became very hilly, but my calories I took in were doing work. I hit 25-26 miles. Slower than I wanted, but the trail were most ideal here compared to what had been. There was that sledding width groomed-ness about this trail. Like someone had taken a kids sled and drug it along the trails making a perfectly person-wide trail that was flat snow and runnable. I have no clue what was going on but I accepted. Quickly came across a wild Megan in a nearby prairie, she had made it back to me again, coatless this time!83797372_2639829856071093_5950830415861252096_o We took a quick pic at a “Springs” sign, and headed back into the wood to the place my car was parked at ZZ. When we arrived, Andrea was pulling her SUV up from her family arrangement she had, kids in tow. Cheering roared from the back seats. They parked and we rounded the corner, with smiles on our faces. I stocked up on some calories at the van, and was given a lucky dollar from one of Andrea’s kids. I tell ya, I find money in the ultras I do well at. This one was worth a lot I guess! (Though I found over $2 in pennies after cloudsplitter 100.)

Megan and I received a rose, and before we got too cold standing there, we hugged our goodbyes and headed off for the final 4 miles. Scupp was an icy covered trail, but SUPER wide, and some of it (we were on the orange loop for what that is worth to those who know the area, I do not lol), was run over by some tractor or something making two paths for each of us to run in. We weren’t fast (I should say just me), but we were running. I hit a wall at mile 29 when I realized I needed something. I had gels but I also only had 2 miles left. I decided to save my gels for next time. Hill after hill came, but mostly in the first 2 miles of this loop. I should mention that I’m so used to opening up on the downhills, but absolutely could NOT at any point during this run because of the ice (traction) or because of the uneven frozen divots in the snow created by other people that would oftentimes turn my ankle. I was snow blind a majority of the day, it was very hard to see any texture in the snow, which lead to more ankle turning and catching myself several times a minute. My hips were so tired.

Though I was fading from nutrition, we came down the final hill back towards where I was parked and hit a decent mile. Could I have kept going? Sure. But why? I was done. I stopped my watched ceremoniously between two trees before reaching the pavement. Seemed like a finish line to me!

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We spied the group running the John Dick 50k the next morning doing set up in the building nearby. I quickly got my car key, grabbed all my stuff to change into and was instantly in the bathrooms to change completely before I froze. I was walking pretty fine. I continue to too. We sat there for a bit at the van having a hot coco before taking off back home. It was really nice, and would definitely do it again not in the winter. I would also dig being the supporter too, as Megan yo-yoing back and forth with me was very entertaining. When would she show up? Who would spot each other first?! It was a great thing to look forward to.

I state what I am happy with:

– I did not get lost once. I had a few questionable spots, but the blazes were really often and clearly marked (maybe not great in the night time though).

– Despite having a heavy pack, I was glad I got the significant amount of practice in with it.

– I managed my feet and nutrition very well. My layers were great and have finally nailed how to handle the upper 20s and low 30s for running with my cold sensitivities.

– Negative splitting the 50k. My second half was faster, as my pace average was in the 17 minute range coming in half way. I know this was mainly due to improving trail conditions (sans that prairie section after Wilton road), but it’s still harder to move faster the further you are into ANY run.

What I am not happy with:

– Judging myself for my pace and effort and layers and comparing them to others when I should not be. I am not running under the same body conditions as others out there and not accepting myself that it IS harder for me to do these things under 40 degrees. On the other hand, I excel when it’s hotter. I have to always remind myself of this.

– Judging my pace. My original goal was in the 7 hour range, but that quickly changed once the trail conditions were more known, and it was not possible. I ended up for B goal which was getting under the Frozen Gnome cut off to “earn” my finish. I know it’s not the same course, but I felt like I needed to do it. I am also constantly comparing my paces to others who have done 50ks recently, even if they had it easier.

– I’m not happy with the trail conditions obviously, but that cannot be helped, just like race day, you can’t control how conditions are, but I did have some control of when I did this. It could have been more ideal for sure, but it also could have been the -28 degrees it was this exact time last year. Take everything with a grain of salt.

What I learned:

– Freezing fog isn’t bad for running, but is not great for driving.

– Winter ultras can go from 100 to 0 very quickly, and become a dangerous situation. I am glad I had others there for my own accountability, but also for safety (first!).

– Never underestimate any 50k (this is always a lesson learned).

– No one cares what your pace is, especially on some training run.

– I have not learned about these snow bugs. Someone educate me.

Why do this? I have done one ultra distance a month since Cloudsplitter in October, so why break the streak?? Its good training for time on feet which is harder for me to get in the winter. I had 4 specific training runs before this 50k attempt. The first two were 9 and 10 miles back to back days, where I feel like I had overdressed, and the pace went well, and were in the fresh snow. The last two were shorter, under 6 miles, but they took everything out of me, and I think it was because I did not use enough layers to stay warm enough, although I was not cold during the run. I also learned if I end up breathing too hard in effort/pace, my throat started to narrow and it becomes harder to breath. I REALLY had to watch that, and learned that on a recent speed workout (which I had never really done when it was cold before due to excess snow covering the ground).

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I have no idea what I will do for February, and I have GDR in March. Everything is really leading up to that, and time on feet and climbing to me are most important for that. After GDR it is green on full time training for Kettle Moraine 100k and after that Badger 100. So many big goals and dreams of mine and I’m staying in Wisconsin for them. I hope again you enjoy this marathon of race reports. I’ll be back in the future with lessons I’ve learned in a blog report soon.

These may be inaccurate but, final stats:

31.1 miles traveled

3,156 gain (and very close to loss as well)

8:25:21 time elapsed

7:48 moving time

16:15 average pace

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